FACTS

FACTS


UnitedWeStay has gathered research from the media, immigration nonprofits, government websites and labor and business organizations to provide the most timely, accurate facts on the deferred action proposed in DACA, as well as other immigration issues vital to us,  America’s Undocumented.

THIS INFORMATION IS A POWERFUL TOOL TOWARD OVERCOMING ALL THE OBSTACLES STANDING BETWEEN US AND EARNING OUR RIGHTFUL PLACE IN AMERICA.



WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW

  • The highest shares of the 11.4-million Undocumented reside in California (28%), Texas (13%), New York (8%) and Florida (6%). Together the top four states account for about 55% of all the Undocumented.

  • Of the more than 11 million, just over half are from Mexico — combined with the 1.7 million from Central America and the percentage rises to two-thirds of the total; 12% are from Asia.

  • One-quarter to one-third of us enter the country legally and overstay our visas.

  • The Migration Policy Institute estimates that about 1.49 million unauthorized young people are eligible to apply for the expanded DACA program because they meet both age and education criteria.

  • Approximately 5 million qualify for deferred action after the President’s 2014 executive order, with 4 million of those coming from DAPA.

  • Over 727,000 applications for DACA have been accepted from 2012 through late 2014.

  • With the announcement of DAPA in November 2014, DACA was expanded to qualify an additional 300,000.

  • About 60% of those eligible for DACA have not applied.

  • There are 6.3 million children who live in a household with a DAPA-eligible parent and 5.5 million of these children are U.S. citizens.

  • California has the highest number of DAPA-eligible parents — over 1.1 million.


DACA: QUALIFICATIONS & BENEFITS

WE’RE ELIGIBLE IF WE:

  • Came to the United States before reaching our 16th birthday.

  • Meet all other requirements regardless of our age under expanded DACA (original age cap was under the age of 31).

  • Have continuously resided in the United States since January 1, 2010.

  • Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or our lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012.

  • Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are honorably discharged veterans of the U.S. armed services.

  • Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

DACA BENEFITS:

  • Relief from deportation and the ability to stay in the United States with our families

    U.S. EAD (Employment Authorization Document) or work permit, which allows us to apply for a Social Security card

  • Renewal under expanded DACA lengthened from two to three years

  • Ability to apply simultaneously for DACA and advance parole to travel internationally

DAPA: QUALIFICATIONS AND BENEFITS

DAPA was blocked in the courts and eventually made its way to the Supreme Court where a split decision left the injunction in place, failing to offer deferred action to millions whose children are U.S. citizens. In June 2017, the Department of Homeland Security rescinded DAPA and left the four-million immigrant parents, who would have qualified, in danger of deportation.

WE’RE ELIGIBLE IF WE:

  • Have a child who was a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident as of November 20, 2014.

  • Have lived continuously in the United States since January 1, 2010, until the present.

  • Were physically present in the United States on November 20, 2014.

  • Have no lawful immigration status on November 20, 2014.

  • Aren’t an enforcement priority according to the new enforcement policy.

  • Present no other factors that make a grant of deferred action inappropriate.

  • Are able to pass a background check.

DAPA BENEFITS:

  • Relief from deportation and the ability to stay in the United States with our families

    U.S. EAD (Employment Authorization Document) or work permit, which allows us to apply for a Social Security card

*Sources: Migration Policy Institute, USCIS, USC Dornsife Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, National Immigration Law Center, L.A. Times,CitizenPath.com, Clearpath.com, etc.